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Whereas: Stories from the People’s House

Displaying Blog Posts 1-5

“Why Not Have it Constitutionally?”: Race, Gender, and the Nineteenth Amendment

On May 21, 1919, Representative James Mann of Illinois, the bespectacled, gray-bearded, 62-year-old former Republican Leader, made an announcement from the House Floor, cementing a change in American history that had been building for decades. “I call up House joint resolution No. 1, proposing an amendment to the Constitution extending the right of suffrage to women,” he said, “and ask that the resolution be reported.”

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Edition for Educators—Celebrating Asian Pacific American Heritage Month 2019

May is Asian Pacific American Heritage Month. In celebration, this Edition for Educators highlights some of the many stories published in Asian and Pacific Islander Americans in Congress, 1900–2017, one of the Office of the Historian’s most recent publications (and online exhibits) which provides an overview of the diverse stories of APA Members and their constituents in the years since Hawaiian Delegate Robert Wilcox first won election to the U.S. House of Representatives. The story of Asian Pacific Americans in Congress can also be found across our website in other stories, artifacts, and House records.

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Railroaded to Congress

“East and West Shaking Hands at the Laying of the Last Rail” Photograph
Grenville Dodge loathed being on Capitol Hill. He much preferred exploring the western wilderness, scoping out the path of the transcontinental railroad. No oath of office could keep him from it.

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Front and Center

Rostrum in the House Chamber
The Speaker’s rostrum announces its importance visually. Framed with walls of multicolored marble, columns, symbolic relief sculptures, and a big American flag, it is located front-and-center in the House Chamber.

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Edition for Educators—The Capitol Campus

Today, the federal legislative branch spreads over five House office buildings, three Senate office buildings, three Library of Congress buildings, and the Capitol itself. This Edition for Educators highlights the Capitol campus and the District of Columbia.

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