House Office Buildings

Blog Post

As the role of the House of Representatives grew over time, the Capitol campus expanded along with it. The three House Office Buildings constructed over the course of the 20th century each uniquely reflect the challenges and changes faced in their eras.

Cannon House Office Building

Cannon House Office Building

The Cannon House Office Building is the oldest congressional office building. When completed in 1908, these new offices for Members of Congress forever changed how the House of Representatives worked.

Longworth House Office Building

Longworth House Office Building

The desperate need for more work space for the House of Representatives coincided with a need for jobs during the Great Depression. The modest and economically-planned Longworth building addressed both the early 1930s.

Rayburn House Office Building

Rayburn House Office Building

The years following World War II brought many changes to Congress—both in the business needing attention, and the ways that work was done. The Rayburn Building—by far the largest of the House offices—embraced mid-century modernism and provided space for expanding committees.

Where They Worked: Office Assignments

Where They Worked: Office Assignments

The advent of dedicated office space in 1908 changed some of the House’s basic functions. Members now had individual rooms in which to meet constituents, conduct business, and keep legislative files. Some of America’s most notable politicians used the spaces that are still occupied by Representatives today.

Related Blog Posts

Related Blog Posts

Learn more about House Office Buildings and the Capitol campus through related blog posts. Explore the history of the Ford and O'Neill House Office Buildings, uncover artifacts from the Cannon House Office Building, and read about the office lottery.