Download or Request our Publications

The Office of the Historian has created several print publications. The most efficient method of accessing these materials is through downloads, websites, and e-books listed below. A limited quantity of print copies are available for educators. Please e-mail history@mail.house.gov for information.

Short Histories

The People’s House: A Guide to Its History, Spaces, and Traditions

In 1921, Clerk William Tyler Page held what one observer called a “training school” for first-term legislators for the first time. Today, the Committee on House Administration, House Officers, and House leadership conduct new-Member orientation shortly after each general election. This booklet provides some fundamentals about the House’s history, its people, geography, artwork, and proceedings.


“Women Must Be Empowered”: The U.S. House of Representatives and the Nineteenth Amendment

House Joint Resolution 1 was one of more than 1,200 pieces of legislation introduced on Opening Day of the 66th Congress (1919–1921), May 19, 1919. Most were mundane; H.J. Res. 1 was anything but. Read the story of how the U.S. House of Representatives passed the 19th Amendment.


“We Are In Earnest For Our Rights”: Representative Joseph H. Rainey and the Struggle for Reconstruction

Joseph Rainey, who became the first African-American Representative in December 1870, navigated a unique path from slave to citizen to Representative. An ardent defender of Black civil and political rights, Rainey directly challenged the calcified traditions of American politics and society.


History of the House Page Program

For more than two centuries, young people served as Pages in the U.S. House of Representatives and enjoyed an unparalleled opportunity to observe and participate in the legislative process in “the People’s House.” The expectations and experiences of House Pages, regardless of when they served, have been linked by certain commonalities—witnessing history, interacting with Representatives, and taking away lifelong inspiration to participate in civic life.


Series of Publications on Women and Minorities in Congress

Asian and Pacific Islander Americans in Congress

Since 1900, when Delegate Robert M. Wilcox of Hawaii became the first Asian Pacific American (APA) to serve in Congress, 67 APAs have served as U.S. Representatives, Delegates, Resident Commissioners, or Senators.



Black Americans in Congress

Since 1870, when Senator Hiram Revels of Mississippi and Joseph Rainey of South Carolina became the first African Americans to serve in Congress, 172 African Americans have served as U.S. Representatives, Senators, or Delegates.


Hispanic Americans in Congress

Since 1822, when Delegate Joseph Marion Hernández of Florida became the first Hispanic American to serve in Congress, 135 Hispanic Americans have served as U.S. Representatives, Delegates, Resident Commissioners, or Senators.



Women in Congress

Since 1917, when Representative Jeannette Rankin of Montana became the first woman to serve in Congress, 393 women have served as U.S. Representatives, Senators, or Delegates.




Biographical Directory of the United States Congress

Since 1859, the Biographical Directory of the United States Congress has been the primary source for biographical information on Members of the United States Congress and Continental Congresses.