The People of the People’s House     

The U.S. House of Representatives is the only branch of federal government elected directly by the citizens of the United States since its founding in 1789. Use searchable profiles and historic lists to discover more about the more than 11,000 individuals elected to the House—as well as information on the officials who have served the institution.

Search the People of the People's House

Search the People of the People's House

Use the multi-faceted search to learn more about the individuals of “the People’s House.” Search filters allow you to navigate through biographical, bibliographical, and research collection information by date or Congress ranges.

Mapping Congress

Mapping Congress

Use a dynamic map to learn more about the House of Representatives. Users can sort by Congress, Leadership, or through the Minorities in Congress series.

Speakers of the House (1789 to present)

Speakers of the House (1789 to present)

Article I, Section 2 of the Constitution states: “The House of Representatives shall chuse their Speaker and other Officers.” When Congress first convened in 1789, the House chose Frederick A.C. Muhlenberg as the first individual to serve as Speaker.

Majority Leaders of the House (1899 to present)

Majority Leaders of the House (1899 to present)

Defined by tradition since the late 19th century, the Majority Leader is charged with scheduling legislation for floor consideration and planning the daily, weekly, and annual legislative agendas.

Minority Leaders of the House (1899 to present)

Minority Leaders of the House (1899 to present)

The floor leader for the "loyal opposition," the Minority Leader serves as the counterpart to the Speaker of the House. He or she speaks for the minority party’s policies and protects its rights.

Democratic Whips (1899 to present)

Democratic Whips (1899 to present)

The Democratic Whip assists his or her party’s leadership with managing its legislative program on the House floor.

Republican Whips (1897 to present)

Republican Whips (1897 to present)

The Republican Whip assists his or her party’s leadership with managing its legislative program on the House floor.

Democratic Caucus Chairmen (1849 to present)

Democratic Caucus Chairmen (1849 to present)

The House Democratic Caucus Chairman presides over his or her party’s meetings, which are attended by all Members of the Democratic Party and serve as the forum to elect party leaders at the outset of each new Congress.

Republican Conference Chairmen (1863 to present)

Republican Conference Chairmen (1863 to present)

The House Republican Conference Chairman presides over his or her party’s meetings, which are attended by all Members of the Republican Party and serve as the forum to elect party leaders at the outset of each new Congress.

House Members Who Became President or Presidential Candidates

House Members Who Became President or Presidential Candidates

Since 1789, 41 Members of the U.S. House of Representatives received at least one Electoral College vote for President.

House Members Who Became Members of the Supreme Court

House Members Who Became Members of the Supreme Court

There have been 17 former House Members who have served on the U.S. Supreme Court. Among this number, two were Chief Justices of the United States.

Clerks of the House (1789 to present)

The House Clerk organizes and presides over the House’s activities at the commencement of each Congress and is charged with a number of legislative functions.

Sergeants at Arms  (1789 to present)

The Sergeant at Arms is the chamber’s principal law enforcement official, charged with maintaining security on the floor and for the House side of the Capitol complex.

Chaplains of the House (1789 to present)

A tradition established by the Continental Congresses, a chaplain has opened House proceedings each day with a prayer since May 1, 1789.

Parliamentarians of the House  (1857 to present)

The Parliamentarian is a nonpartisan official appointed by the Speaker of the House to render objective assistance on legislative and parliamentary procedure to the House of Representatives.

Chief Administrative Officers of the House (1995 to present)

The Chief Administrative Officer oversees financial and administrative functions of the House.

Doorkeepers of the House (1789–1995)

An elected officer for nearly 206 years (1st through 103rd Congresses), the House Doorkeeper controlled access to the chamber and oversaw the press gallery.

Postmasters of the House (1834–1993)

An elected officer for nearly 160 years (24th through the 102nd Congresses), the Postmaster managed mail operations in the House of Representatives.

Continental Congress Members Who Signed the Constitution

Read about the 34 Continental Congress Delegates who signed the Constitution.