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71st Congress (1929–1931)

Congressional Profile

Total Membership:

  • 435 Representatives
  • 2 Delegates
  • 3 Resident Commissioners

Party Divisions:*

  • 164 Democrats
  • 270 Republicans
  • 1 Farmer-Labor

*Party division totals are based on election day results.

  • Election Statistics, 1928 [PDF]

Congress Overview

The 71st Congress (1929–1931) confronted the worst economy in American history. During a special session called by the new President Herbert Hoover, the Republican-controlled Congress responded to the long-term agricultural recession with the Agricultural Marketing Act. Congress enacted the Smoot-Hawley Tariff after the October 1929 stock market crash. The tariff raised the prices of imported goods and further exacerbated a worldwide economic downturn as international trade collapsed. Congress also established the Veterans’ Administration as an independent agency and adopted Francis Scott Key’s “The Star-Spangled Banner” as the national anthem.

Historical Highlights

See more Historical Highlights.

Member Information

  • Biographical Directory of the U.S. Congress, (1774–2005), Official Annotated Membership Roster by State with Vacancy and Special Election Information for the 71st Congress. [PDF]
  • Learn more about the House of Representatives with an interactive map

Learn more about the People of the People's House

Leadership & Officers

Speaker of the House:
Nicholas Longworth (R–Ohio)
Majority Leader:
John Q. Tilson (R–Connecticut)
Minority Leader:
John N. Garner (D–Texas)
Democratic Whip:
John McDuffie (D–Alabama)
Republican Whip:
Albert H. Vestal (R–Indiana)
Democratic Caucus Chairman:
David H. Kincheloe (D–Kentucky) 1
Republican Conference Chairman:
Willis C. Hawley (R–Oregon)
Clerk of the House:
William Tyler Page
Sergeant at Arms:
Joseph G. Rogers
Chaplain of the House:
James Shera Montgomery – Methodist
Doorkeeper:
Bert W. Kennedy
Postmaster:
Frank W. Collier
Parliamentarian:
Lewis Deschler

To view complete lists of individuals who have served in these leadership and official positions since the 1st Congress, visit the People section

Footnotes

1Resigned from the House, October 5, 1930; there is no record of an election to fill the vacancy as caucus chair.