Railway Joint Tariff

Railway Joint Tariff/tiles/non-collection/h/hi_004imgtile1.xml
Image courtesy of the National Archives and Records Administration
Railway Joint Tariff/tiles/non-collection/h/hi_004imgtile2.xml
Image courtesy of the National Archives and Records Administration
Railway Joint Tariff/tiles/non-collection/h/hi_004imgtile3.xml
Image courtesy of the National Archives and Records Administration
Railway Joint Tariff/tiles/non-collection/h/hi_004imgtile4.xml
Image courtesy of the National Archives and Records Administration

Description

Railroads provided quick transportation for goods in the 19th century, as the population expanded to the West. As a fast freight company, the Star Union Line offered shipping between cities on the East Coast and the Midwest. The Star Union Line was acquired by the Pennsylvania Company in 1873. Shortly afterward, the House Committee on Commerce began investigating railroad company mergers for monopolies. Through the investigation, documentation about railroads, such as this tariff schedule, became part of the official records of the committee. The tariff schedule has informational value, as it records the kinds of goods being produced and shipped at the time. In the late 19th century, axle grease, billiard tables, burial cases, coconuts, cotton, fire crackers, dried fruit, hoop skirts, mercury, printing presses, piano legs, sewing machines, smoked tongues, spices, syrup, telegraph wire, tobacco, and whalebone were all transported by rail.

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