Speaker Portrait: J. Dennis Hastert

U.S. Capitol/tiles/non-collection/o/oh_obj_hastert_portrait_hc.xml Collection of the U.S. House of Representatives
About this object
The only Speaker portrait set in the House Chamber, J. Dennis Hastert is posed in front of the Speaker’s chair on the rostrum, holding a gavel. The silver inkstand, associated with the chamber since it came to the House around 1820, and the mace, a symbol of authority derived from ancient Rome, both of which are present in the chamber when the House is in session, are depicted in the portrait. Former Speaker of the House J. Dennis Hastert describes the symbols of the House and explains why he chose to include them in his portrait.

Featured Video

Symbolism and the Speakership

Speaker Hastert explains the symbolism in his portrait.
The Honorable J. Dennis Hastert, Speaker of the U.S. House of Representatives
Interview recorded May 1, 2012 Deed of Gift

Video

Symbolism and the Speakership

Speaker Hastert explains the symbolism in his portrait.
The Honorable J. Dennis Hastert, Speaker of the U.S. House of Representatives
Interview recorded May 1, 2012 Deed of Gift

Portrait Unveiling

Speaker Hastert recalls his portrait unveiling.
The Honorable J. Dennis Hastert, Speaker of the U.S. House of Representatives
Interview recorded May 1, 2012 Deed of Gift

Busy Life of a Speaker

Speaker Hastert discusses the hectic schedules of modern-day Speakers of the House.
The Honorable J. Dennis Hastert, Speaker of the U.S. House of Representatives
Interview recorded May 1, 2012 Deed of Gift

Images & Artifacts

John Dennis Hastert
<em>John Dennis Hastert</em>/tiles/non-collection/o/oh_obj_hastert_portrait_hc.xml
The Honorable J. Dennis Hastert of Illinois served as the 51st Speaker of the House.
Collection of the U.S. House of Representatives
About this object
Inkstand
<em>Inkstand</em>/tiles/non-collection/o/oh_object_inkstand_hc.xml
Before the Speaker calls each session of the House to order, this coin-silver inkstand is placed on the rostrum. The inkstand is considered the oldest surviving artifact of the House and was made between 1810 and 1820. Although its origins are mysterious, it most likely came into the House around 1819.
Collection of the U.S. House of Representatives
About this object
Mace
<em>Mace</em>/tiles/non-collection/o/oh_object_mace_hc.xml
The silver Mace, symbol of the House’s authority, has been in use in the House since 1841 when the Members met in the old House Chamber. It was crafted by William Adams, a New York silversmith. The original House Mace had been destroyed when the British burned the Capitol in 1814, and during the intervening years, a wooden mace was used. A silver globe with an eagle perched on it sits at the top of the Mace, with the Western Hemisphere facing front.
Collection of the U.S. House of Representatives
About this object