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Gohn to Cannon

Gohn to Cannon/tiles/non-collection/c/c_089imgtile1.xml
Image courtesy of the National Archives and Records Administration
Gohn to Cannon/tiles/non-collection/c/c_089imgtile2.xml
Image courtesy of the National Archives and Records Administration
Gohn to Cannon/tiles/non-collection/c/c_089imgtile3.xml
Image courtesy of the National Archives and Records Administration

Description

Corwin S. Gohn, postmaster general of Alton, Missouri, wrote Speaker Joseph Cannon regarding Representative-elect Charles Crow of Missouri’s 14th District. “Your work last campaign ‘showed us’ you were interested in our State and District, that it remain Republican henceforth,” Gohn wrote, making a humorous allusion to Missouri’s moniker, “The Show-Me State.” Gohn enthusiastically endorsed Crow as “an energetic young man, full of fine business qualities,” who “has the interests of his constituents at heart.” At the time, the Speaker held exclusive power in determining committee assignments. Gohn asked Cannon for preferential treatment for Crow, including assignments to the Committee on Post Office and Post Roads and the Committee on Rivers and Harbors. He also sought leverage with Cannon for these requests by pointing out that he was a native of Danville, Illinois—a city in Cannon’s district and his residence—and that any favors bestowed on Crow would be returned in kind.

During the 61st Congress (1909–1911), Crow sat on three committees: Levees and Improvements of the Mississippi River, Pensions, and Public Lands. His opportunity to move to a more desirable committee never materialized, as he lost the next election to Democrat Joseph J. Russell, who reclaimed his seat and represented the district for eight years through the end of the 65th Congress in March 1919.

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