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Call Book for Civil Rights Act of 1964

Call Book for Civil Rights Act of 1964/tiles/non-collection/l/lfp_042imgtile1.xml
Image courtesy of the National Archives and Records Administration
Call Book for Civil Rights Act of 1964/tiles/non-collection/l/lfp_042imgtile2.xml
Image courtesy of the National Archives and Records Administration
Call Book for Civil Rights Act of 1964/tiles/non-collection/l/lfp_042imgtile3.xml
Image courtesy of the National Archives and Records Administration
Call Book for Civil Rights Act of 1964/tiles/non-collection/l/lfp_042imgtile4.xml
Image courtesy of the National Archives and Records Administration
Call Book for Civil Rights Act of 1964/tiles/non-collection/l/lfp_042imgtile5.xml
Image courtesy of the National Archives and Records Administration

Description

On February 10, 1964, the House voted on H.R. 7152, known as the Civil Rights Act of 1964. As the first page of this call book shows, the bill passed the House, 290 to 130, following intense debate and legislative negotiation. The bill enforced equal access to public accommodations and desegregation of public schools and facilities and prohibited discrimination in hiring and employment. President Lyndon Johnson signed it into law on July 2, 1964.

Long-time Reading Clerk Joe Bartlett initialed the stamp in the top-left corner of this call book showing the final vote count for the Civil Rights Act of 1964. During the vote, Bartlett read aloud from the call book that listed the names of the Representatives, and he marked an upstroke through the Member’s name to signify a yea vote, and a down stroke was a nay vote for the bill. The first call of the Member’s name by the reading clerk was marked with a blue pencil; if the Member didn’t respond on the first call, the vote on the second call of the roll was marked with a red pencil.

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