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“The House of Representatives, in some respects, I think, is the most peculiar assemblage in the world,” Speaker Joe Cannon of Illinois once observed. Behind the legislation and procedure, House Members and staff have produced their own institutional history and heritage. Our blog, Whereas: Stories from the People’s House, tells their stories.

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Displaying 373–384 of 459 results

What Did You #AskACurator?

What item in the House Collection looks like it came straight out of a horror film? Inquiring minds wanted to know and they got their answer on #AskACurator Day.
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(Stereo)View the House in 3-D

Anaglyph Version of House Chamber Stereoview
“A new optical instrument, called the Stereoscope, is attracting much attention,” wrote the Baltimore Sun in 1852. The apparatus worked with special images, called stereoviews. Seen through the stereoscope, these prints appeared shockingly three-dimensional. No need for 19th century technology. Now you can put on your 3-D glasses to explore the history of this format and take a new look at House Collection stereoviews.
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Edition for Educators—Joint Meetings and Joint Sessions

This month's Edition for Educators highlights Joint Meetings and Joint Sessions. The two houses of Congress generally work separately, but on occasion the House of Representatives and the Senate gather together in Joint Meetings and Joint Sessions for moments of historic significance.
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Edition for Educators—In Pursuit of House Trivia

This month’s Edition for Educators highlights trivia spanning the history of the House of Representatives, spotlighting a few unique firsts, records, and watershed moments. Who was the first known Representative to be elected by a write-in vote? What is on Charles Schulz’s Congressional Gold Medal? And how long would “Uncle Joe” cook a ham hock for his bean soup? All of this trivia and more can be found on the History, Art & Archives website.
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Categories: Edition for Educators

Wheelchairs, Ramps, and a Scooter Named “Lulu”

In the House of Representatives, accessibility was a subject of consideration on the House Floor in the first half of the 20th century, many decades before Rep. Tony Coelho introduced the Americans with Disabilities Act in 1989. Wheelchairs, scooters, and ramps were known to be used in the Chamber and around the Capitol as early as 1881. Photographs from the House Collection document the history of accessibility in the House Chamber.
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"20 Little Salesmen"

Not so long ago, match companies touted “the smashing advertising power of book matches!” as the best way to light a fire under voters. Budget-conscious candidates agreed. Low cost and wide use turned a set of strikes into “20 little salesmen” for congressional candidates.
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Categories: Elections, Artifacts

Edition for Educators—Fun and Games

Nicholas Longworth
This month's Edition for Educators highlights pastimes in the House of Representatives, from baseball to horseshoes.
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Categories: Edition for Educators

“An Attractive and Luscious Plum”: Capitol Guides in the 1920s

Capitol Guides Elizabeth and Anna Eliza Smith
No, you’re not seeing double: these happy Capitol guides are twins.
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History, Art & Archives’ Top Ten List

Television at the Capitol
In the spirit of Top Ten Lists on late night television, History, Art & Archives presents our ten favorite Historical Highlights and Blog Posts.
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Categories: Announcements

Edition for Educators—The Old House and the Sea

Peace (The White Squadron in Boston Harbor)
On January 20, 1794, Members in the House of Representatives introduced a bill providing for a standing U.S. Navy. Though the bill faced heavy opposition from Members wary of a standing military force, the bill passed the House on March 10, as the threat of piracy loomed in the Mediterranean Sea. This Edition for Educators celebrates the House of Representatives’ maritime connections.
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Categories: Edition for Educators

Hawaii Comes to the Capitol

A Hawaiian hoolaulea in the Capitol
Aloha! Speakers of the House Nicholas Longworth and William Bankhead agreed with the Los Angeles Times: “We don’t need an excuse to enjoy the relaxed, romantic pleasure of a Hawaiian party.” In the 1920s and 1930s, Hawaiian-style parties flourished across the states, and even made it to the Capitol.
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The Unlucky Seventh

Abraham Lincoln
If you studied Latin in school you may recall the phrase, “Omne trium perfectum” (every set of three is complete). From history to pop culture, trios make for interesting stories. Ancient Rome had Julius Caesar, Cleopatra, and Mark Antony. The antebellum Senate boasted its Great Triumvirate—Webster, Calhoun, and Clay. The Bee Gees laid down the beat for 1970s disco goers. Harry Potter and his friends, Ron and Hermione, spellbound a later generation. The Illinois Seventh Congressional District of the 1840s spawned its own memorable political trio: John J. Hardin, Edward D. Baker, and Abraham Lincoln.
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