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“The House of Representatives, in some respects, I think, is the most peculiar assemblage in the world,” Speaker Joe Cannon of Illinois once observed. Behind the legislation and procedure, House Members and staff have produced their own institutional history and heritage. Our blog, Whereas: Stories from the People’s House, tells their stories.

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Displaying 121–132 of 416 results

Edition for Educators—The Old House and the Sea

Peace (The White Squadron in Boston Harbor)
On January 20, 1794, Members in the House of Representatives introduced a bill providing for a standing U.S. Navy. Though the bill faced heavy opposition from Members wary of a standing military force, the bill passed the House on March 10, as the threat of piracy loomed in the Mediterranean Sea. This Edition for Educators celebrates the House of Representatives’ maritime connections.
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Categories: Edition for Educators

History, Art & Archives’ Top Ten List

Television at the Capitol
In the spirit of Top Ten Lists on late night television, History, Art & Archives presents our ten favorite Historical Highlights and Blog Posts.
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Categories: Announcements

#ThenAndNow: Photographs from the House Collection

Then and Now photo of horseshoes game practice at the Capitol
May is National Photo Month. We celebrated by spotlighting four photographs from the House Collection, creating and tweeting #ThenAndNow images around the Capitol.
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Chasing Congress Away

John Dickinson
In the summer of 1783, a rowdy, slightly tipsy band of unpaid soldiers chased the Confederation Congress from Philadelphia, its home for much of the Revolutionary War.
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“An Attractive and Luscious Plum”: Capitol Guides in the 1920s

Capitol Guides Elizabeth and Anna Eliza Smith
No, you’re not seeing double: these happy Capitol guides are twins.
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The Man in Black’s Tribute to the Ragged Old Flag

On June 14, 1977, the Man in Black strode into the House Chamber as if it were the stage of a country music hall. But music legend Johnny Cash wasn't about to belt out tunes for any ordinary concert. Rather, Cash delivered a moving poem to celebrate the bicentennial of the U.S. flag.
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Edition for Educators—Fun and Games

Nicholas Longworth
This month's Edition for Educators highlights pastimes in the House of Representatives, from baseball to horseshoes.
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Categories: Edition for Educators

When Ice Cream Got Hot in Congress

Bossie the Cow in the House Office Building Courtyard
In October 1921, a cow mysteriously appeared in the grassy House Office Building courtyard. Bossie arrived amid milkshake profiteering, sundae protests, and illegal ice cream on the Capitol grounds. Cold and creamy on a summer evening, ice cream seems like the most innocent of sweets. But it once got pretty sticky around the House.
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"20 Little Salesmen"

Not so long ago, match companies touted “the smashing advertising power of book matches!” as the best way to light a fire under voters. Budget-conscious candidates agreed. Low cost and wide use turned a set of strikes into “20 little salesmen” for congressional candidates.
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Categories: Elections, Artifacts

Edition for Educators—Continental and Confederation Congresses

Fifteen years before the First Federal Congress met, Great Britain’s American colonies convened a Continental Congress in response to the Intolerable Acts, a series of taxes imposed in the wake of the Boston Tea Party incident of December 1773. The Confederation Congress was dissolved after ratification of the Constitution, and prior to the convening of the First Federal Congress in the spring of 1789.
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Party Like It's 1732

Landmark birthdays are a big deal, and for George Washington’s 200th, a master party planner was necessary. The House’s own Rep. Sol Bloom applied his talents to the task, coordinating a cross-country series of events—and some interesting souvenirs—throughout 1932.


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Wheelchairs, Ramps, and a Scooter Named “Lulu”

In the House of Representatives, accessibility was a subject of consideration on the House Floor in the first half of the 20th century, many decades before Rep. Tony Coelho introduced the Americans with Disabilities Act in 1989. Wheelchairs, scooters, and ramps were known to be used in the Chamber and around the Capitol as early as 1881. Photographs from the House Collection document the history of accessibility in the House Chamber.
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