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“The House of Representatives, in some respects, I think, is the most peculiar assemblage in the world,” Speaker Joe Cannon of Illinois once observed. Behind the legislation and procedure, House Members and staff have produced their own institutional history and heritage. Our blog, Whereas: Stories from the People’s House, tells their stories.

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Displaying 1–12 of 428 results

Maps in the Archives: Dark Graphics

“Single Bullet Theory” Trajectory Diagram
The following maps capture three of the nation’s darkest moments with striking and sometimes shocking images.
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Edition for Educators—Hispanic Leadership in the House

In celebration of Hispanic Heritage Month, this Edition for Educators highlights Hispanic Representatives in leadership roles throughout the history of the House.
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The Man Who Kept Opening Doors Until He Became the Doorkeeper

A self-proclaimed “political creature,” James T. “Jim” Molloy left an enduring mark on the Capitol during his decades in Washington. Using a unique blend of scrappiness, charm, and his deep roots in New York state politics, Molloy created a network of allies who vaulted him to one of the most influential staff positions on the Hill. After little more than five years working for the House, he won a prized appointment as the House Doorkeeper by ousting a longtime incumbent. Molloy assumed office, he recalled, feeling “like a kid in a candy store,” perfectly at home in a position that seemed made for the affable South Buffalo native.
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License to Legislate

Detail of a 1972 Congressional License Plate
Congressional license plates may have been just thin strips of metal affixed to the top of a regular license plate, but the plates ended up giving Members of Congress motoring superpowers.
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Edition for Educators—September 11, 2001

As the worst terrorist attack in United States history unfolded on the morning of September 11, 2001, federal officials, lawmakers, and congressional staff took unprecedented steps to maintain government operations and protect the House of Representatives and the people on the Capitol campus. In this Edition for Educators, we look back on the day and its aftermath 20 years later.
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Pictures of an Impeachment

Thaddeus Stevens Reading the Newspaper
On February 24, 1868, the House of Representatives impeached President Andrew Johnson. This first-ever presidential impeachment captured the public’s attention, and mass-produced images—the up-and-coming visual media—fed the hunger for details.
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Edition for Educators—Records Search

Detail of the Petition to Abolish Slavery in the District of Columbia
This Edition for Educators showcases the types of primary sources available on Records Search. Engage students and bring history to life with original congressional records.
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Edition for Educators – Voting Rights and the House

Because the House has always been directly elected by the American people, its membership has often reflected changes to the country’s voting laws. And as more people won access to the ballot, the House grew increasingly diverse. This Edition for Educators features resources found on the History, Art & Archives website on the topic of voting rights.
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“Here will I hold my stand”: James Tallmadge Jr. and the Fight to Stop the Spread of Slavery

As a young man, James Tallmadge of New York challenged policymakers to uphold the principles of equality in the Declaration and make real a world devoid of slavery. Two decades later, when Tallmadge was one of those policymakers, he turned away from idealism of his youth and toward the legal might of the Constitution to limit slavery’s spread.
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Northwest from the Capitol

Looking Northwest from the Capitol Stereoview
Take a close look at this “Bird’s-eye View” stereoview. The photographer pointed his camera northwest from the Capitol dome toward Indiana Avenue and clicked. The result shows a city exploding into being in the 1870s and 1880s.
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Categories: Capitol Campus, Artifacts

Edition for Educators—First Federal Congress

This Edition for Educators celebrates Independence Day with a look back at the First Federal Congress, first convened on March 4, 1789.
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A Marvel among Swindles: The Louisiana State Lottery Company and the Post Office Department

Advertisement for the Louisiana State Lottery
Records of the House Committee on Post Office and Post Roads and congressional sources help tell the dramatic story of congressional intervention into the 19th-century Louisiana State Lottery Company.
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