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“The House of Representatives, in some respects, I think, is the most peculiar assemblage in the world,” Speaker Joe Cannon of Illinois once observed. Behind the legislation and procedure, House Members and staff have produced their own institutional history and heritage. Our blog, Whereas: Stories from the People’s House, tells their stories.

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Displaying 1–12 of 432 results

Recent Artifacts Online, Fall 2021

House Restaurant Teacup
All year, newly digitized artifacts join the thousands already available online. Take a look at a few added this autumn, and browse more of the House’s most eye-catching and recognizable objects at Collections Search.
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“Somebody Was Going to Be the First”

During the 1970s, amid the women’s liberation movement, women across the country fought for equal rights and for a louder voice in the decision-making process on a wide range of domestic and international issues. Capitol Hill also became more diverse, as women of color—Members and staff alike—won election to and took jobs in the House, changing a powerful workplace which had been dominated by White men since its inception.
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National History Day 2022: “Debate and Diplomacy: Success, Failures, and Consequences”

Members of Congress debating in the 1890s
Finding research topics to inspire students competing in National History Day (NHD) can be challenging. To help start their projects, the History, Art & Archives team has listed a few topics that fit with this year’s theme: “Debate and Diplomacy: Success, Failures, and Consequences.” Use these resources—pulled from different sections of our website—to start on a new project.
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Kitchen Table Campaigning

John Bonifas Bennett Sewing Kit detail
About 30 years after the 19th Amendment was ratified in 1920, political campaigns increasingly targeted women for votes. Political appeals to women were by no means a new idea. However, women’s relatively recent victory in winning the right to vote, coupled with postwar sexism, added modern twists to old traditions of looking for women’s political support.
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Maps in the Archives: Dark Graphics

“Single Bullet Theory” Trajectory Diagram
The following maps capture three of the nation’s darkest moments with striking and sometimes shocking images.
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Edition for Educators—Hispanic Leadership in the House

In celebration of Hispanic Heritage Month, this Edition for Educators highlights Hispanic Representatives in leadership roles throughout the history of the House.
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The Man Who Kept Opening Doors Until He Became the Doorkeeper

A self-proclaimed “political creature,” James T. “Jim” Molloy left an enduring mark on the Capitol during his decades in Washington. Using a unique blend of scrappiness, charm, and his deep roots in New York state politics, Molloy created a network of allies who vaulted him to one of the most influential staff positions on the Hill. After little more than five years working for the House, he won a prized appointment as the House Doorkeeper by ousting a longtime incumbent. Molloy assumed office, he recalled, feeling “like a kid in a candy store,” perfectly at home in a position that seemed made for the affable South Buffalo native.
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License to Legislate

Detail of a 1972 Congressional License Plate
Congressional license plates may have been just thin strips of metal affixed to the top of a regular license plate, but the plates ended up giving Members of Congress motoring superpowers.
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Edition for Educators—September 11, 2001

As the worst terrorist attack in United States history unfolded on the morning of September 11, 2001, federal officials, lawmakers, and congressional staff took unprecedented steps to maintain government operations and protect the House of Representatives and the people on the Capitol campus. In this Edition for Educators, we look back on the day and its aftermath 20 years later.
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Pictures of an Impeachment

Thaddeus Stevens Reading the Newspaper
On February 24, 1868, the House of Representatives impeached President Andrew Johnson. This first-ever presidential impeachment captured the public’s attention, and mass-produced images—the up-and-coming visual media—fed the hunger for details.
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Edition for Educators—Records Search

Detail of the Petition to Abolish Slavery in the District of Columbia
This Edition for Educators showcases the types of primary sources available on Records Search. Engage students and bring history to life with original congressional records.
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Edition for Educators – Voting Rights and the House

Because the House has always been directly elected by the American people, its membership has often reflected changes to the country’s voting laws. And as more people won access to the ballot, the House grew increasingly diverse. This Edition for Educators features resources found on the History, Art & Archives website on the topic of voting rights.
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