Reapportioning

Double desk, 1867. Reconfigured, original design by Thomas Walter./tiles/non-collection/i/i_apportion_walter_desk_back_hc.xml
Walter Double Desk, Anonymous Loan to the U.S. House of Representatives Only ten years after the new House Chamber was completed, desks like these were being conjoined to accommodate increased membership.
Double desk, 1867. Reconfigured, original design by Thomas Walter./tiles/non-collection/i/i_apportion_walter_desk_front_hc.xml
Walter Double Desk, Anonymous Loan to the U.S. House of Representatives Members who were unlucky in the annual desk lottery were the most likely occupants of the conjoined desks.
Presently the U.S. Census Bureau must deliver the results of a decennial census to the President of the United States within nine months of the census date. Within a week of the opening of the next Congress, the President is required by law to report the census results to Congress. Within 15 days, the Clerk must then disclose to the governor of each state how many seats his or her state is entitled. The state legislatures are charged with redrawing a state’s congressional districts. Apportionments take affect two Congresses (three years) after the last census. The last (23rd) Census was conducted on April 1, 2010 and apportionment will take effect for the 113th Congress (2013-2015). For more information, see the United States Census Bureau website.