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Levees on the Mississippi River

Levees on the Mississippi River/tiles/non-collection/p/pm_018imgtile1.xml
Image courtesy of the National Archives and Records Administration
Levees on the Mississippi River/tiles/non-collection/p/pm_018imgtile2.xml
Image courtesy of the National Archives and Records Administration

Description

The Mississippi River flows approximately 2,350 miles before reaching its delta at the Gulf of Mexico. The water supply, shipping industry, and flooding cycles have had a significant effect on communities from Minnesota to Louisiana. When Congress considered a $9 million bill in 1890 to build levees, improve navigation, and prevent floods, citizens from many states urged federal assistance. This memorial was signed by African-American residents of six Mississippi counties: Bolivar, Washington, Coahoma, Tunica, Issaquena, and Warren. The bill, H.R. 12168, was referred to the Committee on Levees and Improvements of the Mississippi River. Although the U.S. Army Corps of Engineers built levees over the next several decades, a disastrous 1927 flood devastated Mississippi, Arkansas, and Louisiana.

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