Designating Bourbon Whiskey

Designating Bourbon Whiskey/tiles/non-collection/l/lfp_010imgtile1.xml
Image courtesy of the National Archives and Records Administration
Designating Bourbon Whiskey/tiles/non-collection/l/lfp_010imgtile2.xml
Image courtesy of the National Archives and Records Administration
Designating Bourbon Whiskey/tiles/non-collection/l/lfp_010imgtile3.xml
Image courtesy of the National Archives and Records Administration

Description

Despite setbacks created by Prohibition and World War II, by the 1950s the Kentucky bourbon industry rebounded. In 1963, bourbon was the top-selling liquor in the United States, and the various brands produced 75 million gallons of bourbon and spent more than $34 million on advertising. This wave of popularity crested in 1964 when the House passed H. Con. Res 57, designating bourbon as a “distinctive product” of the United States. Both chambers passed the Senate's version of the concurrent resolution (S. Con. Res. 19), which ensured that bourbon was made in the United States. This offered trade protection against foreign competitors in a manner similar to tariffs on other spirits produced overseas, such as French champagne or Scotch whiskey. The concurrent resolution was not a law and did not require the President’s signature.

Related Subjects

Historical Highlight