History, Art & Archives of the U.S. House of Representatives

Tax Reform with a Side of Margarine

Representative William S. Cowherd

Nineteenth-century tax policy was hardly as dry as plain toast. Congress returned to the margarine debate again and again for nearly 65 years.

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Categories: Institution

Being Seen and Heard—A Tantalizing Prospect

Clifford Berryman's Political Cartoon
A parliamentary insult hurled at a Republican freshman had the effect of briefly banding his colleagues into a memorable (and merry) bloc.

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Categories: People, House Traditions

Edition for Educators – Technology in the House

Congresswomen in Radio Debate
The July Edition for Educators is dedicated to advances in technology and communication in the House of Representatives. Learn more about the how advances in technology have transformed the U.S. House of Representatives.

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Categories: Education

Please Pass the Gavel

Bob Michel
During his nearly four decade career in Congress, Republican Leader Bob Michel of Illinois had only one chance to preside over the House. Ironically, his short-lived time in the Speaker’s chair came when the Democrats held the majority and because his colleague Speaker Tom Foley of Washington decided that Michel had waited long enough to wield the gavel.

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Edition for Educators – Summer Reading

Among the Lawmakers
The History, Art & Archives website has all you need to keep your mind sharp (and entertained) this summer. Learn more about some “summer reading” options about the House of Representatives.

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Categories: Education

The British Are Coming!

More than 150 years after the American Revolution, King George VI and Queen Elizabeth of England made history when they set foot on American soil. As the first reigning English monarchs to visit the United States, they received a much warmer reception than the British forces of Paul Revere’s time. Amid much fanfare and eager anticipation on both sides of the Atlantic on the eve of World War II, the royal couple embarked on a brief but meaningful tour of the U.S. and Canada, which included a formal reception at the U.S. Capitol on June 9, 1939.

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