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“The House of Representatives, in some respects, I think, is the most peculiar assemblage in the world,” Speaker Joe Cannon of Illinois once observed. Behind the legislation and procedure, House Members and staff have produced their own institutional history and heritage. Our blog, Whereas: Stories from the People’s House, tells their stories.

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#ThenAndNow: Photographs from the House Collection

Then and Now photo of horseshoes game practice at the Capitol
May is National Photo Month. We celebrated by spotlighting four photographs from the House Collection, creating and tweeting #ThenAndNow images around the Capitol.
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History, Art & Archives’ Top Ten List

Television at the Capitol
In the spirit of Top Ten Lists on late night television, History, Art & Archives presents our ten favorite Historical Highlights and Blog Posts.
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Categories: Announcements

Edition for Educators—The Old House and the Sea

Peace (The White Squadron in Boston Harbor)
On January 20, 1794, Members in the House of Representatives introduced a bill providing for a standing U.S. Navy. Though the bill faced heavy opposition from Members wary of a standing military force, the bill passed the House on March 10, as the threat of piracy loomed in the Mediterranean Sea. This Edition for Educators celebrates the House of Representatives’ maritime connections.
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Categories: Edition for Educators

Sketchy Job Interview

When Constantino Brumidi first arrived at the United States Capitol, he made this sketch. It was his job application to paint the capitol's frescoes. Brumidi ultimately decorated much of the Capitol's interior. And this little painting is where it all began.
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Categories: Capitol Campus, Art

Hawaii Comes to the Capitol

A Hawaiian hoolaulea in the Capitol
Aloha! Speakers of the House Nicholas Longworth and William Bankhead agreed with the Los Angeles Times: “We don’t need an excuse to enjoy the relaxed, romantic pleasure of a Hawaiian party.” In the 1920s and 1930s, Hawaiian-style parties flourished across the states, and even made it to the Capitol.
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